How to use style guidelines to improve your Python code

The flexibility of programming languages like Python means that any code you write to tackle a given problem will differ in approach and style to code written by someone else....

How to use SQLite in Python

SQLite is a relational database management system (RDBMS) that is easy to access within Python and other languages. Unlike MySQL, PostgreSQL, and other databases, SQLite uses a serverless design, so...

How to use operators in Python

For data scientists, Python operators are one of the most powerful and widely used features of this language. These special symbols or characters tell Python to perform some sort of...

How to use lists in Python

Lists are one of the most widely used data storage objects or data types within Python and are used throughout every data science package. Along with the dictionary, tuple, and...

How to use Git for your data science projects

Git is the world’s most widely used version control system and is an essential tool for data scientists, especially those collaborating on projects with others. You’ll need to be able...

How to use docstrings to improve your Python code

Docstrings are comment blocks that are added to the top of Python functions to explain the purpose of the function, describe the arguments that it accepts, and explain what the...

How to use the Pandas value_counts() function

The Pandas value_counts() function can be used to count the number of times a value occurs within a dataframe column or series, as well as calculating frequency distributions. Here’s a...

How to query MySQL and other databases using Pandas

For years, I used to spend much of my time performing Exploratory Data Analysis directly in SQL. Over time, the queries I wrote became very complicated, and it was often...

How to open, read, and write to files in Python

While data scientists may do nearly everything in Pandas, we also need to perform file operations in regular Python and in applications not tied to dataframes. Thankfully, Python makes it...